Germany exchange students and t-bars school shoes

Germany is another country without school uniforms. But when their students head to Australia on exchange programs, they need to do their best to fit with their uniformed classmates at their their host schools.

But no summer dresses and t-bars here – just green shorts, a white blouse, and a pair of black ballet flats.

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Bayside P-12 College

Girls at Bayside P-12 College in Melbourne are permitted to wear t-bar school shoes. They wear them with short white ankle socks in summer, and navy tights in winter.

http://www.bayside.vic.edu.au/index.php/community/uniform/item/download/43_3c53801916d10122d7793653c3913d4c

GIRLS SUMMER
Blazer Navy regulation with crest (not all sizes available)
Jacket Navy soft shell outer jacket with crest
Pullover Plain navy V-neck with crest
Dress Grey check/white trim (mid knee to 5cm above)
Shirt White (S/S) shirt with crest
Shorts Mid grey with woven Bayside flag
Socks Short white ankle
Hats Navy broadbrim with crest
Shoes Black leather lace up or T-Bar
Bag Navy Airopak with crest

GIRLS WINTER
Blazer Navy regulation with crest (not all sizes available)
Jacket Navy soft shell outer jacket with crest
Pullover Plain navy V-neck with crest
Blouse White (L/S) blouse with crest
Skirt Regulation check with bib for growth
Pants Mid grey with woven Bayside flag
Socks Short white ankle or grey ankle (trousers)
Hats Navy broadbrim with crest
Scarf Navy cashmere feel
Shoes Black leather lace up or T-Bar

http://www.bayside.vic.edu.au/index.php/community/uniform/item/download/4_54af212432115fae86d14114b3d946a0

Students are required to wear appropriate sturdy black leather school shoes

School shoes worn as part of the formal (academic) school uniform and in all technology, science and art classes must comply with the following criteria:

o Be of sturdy black leather construction (fully enclose the foot)
o Be in a lace-up or T-Bar style.o Should not display any ‘logos’
o Should have a heel that does not exceed 3 cm.

Unacceptable Footwear:
o Any footwear that resembles a casual shoe, runner, ballet style shoe or slip-on
o Any footwear that is not of sturdy black leather construction
o Any footwear that does not have a heel of less than 3 cm

No skate or runner style shoe with a flat sole should be worn

Mitcham Girls High School

Girls at Mitcham Girls High School in Adelaide are permitted to wear t-bar school shoes. They are worn with short white, black or navy socks, or navy or black pantihose in winter.

December 2010

http://www.mitchamgirlshs.sa.edu.au/files/2011%20A5%20Footwear%20flier%20to%20students%208_12_10.doc

After considerable consultation with students, parents and staff regarding acceptable school shoes for students and in accordance with OHSW guidelines to have a solid heel and sole and provide adequate support and protection, the Uniform Committee advises that from 2011 the following styles are the accepted Dress Code:

– Leather or vinyl lace up shoe
– Mary Jane shoe with a Velcro or buckle strap(elastic straps will not be acceptable)
– T-Bar shoe

These shoes will be available from the Uniform Shop in 2011. Further information and images of these shoes are on the back of this leaflet.

Girls in shorts at MLC Kew

Girls at Methodist Ladies’ College in Kew are now permitted to wear shorts as part of their summer school uniform.

https://www.mlc.vic.edu.au/About-MLC/MLC-Uniform

In response to student feedback, we are delighted to be adding shorts and a short-sleeve shirt option to our Summer academic uniform.

Both garments have been developed to work with existing uniform items and are similar to the MLC pants and winter shirt. Students have the flexibility to mix and match the various pieces from both the winter and summer uniforms in order to feel most comfortable.

Whilst it is important to have a unifying MLC uniform that students are proud to wear, we also support providing flexible options to suit each students’ individual preferences, much like they will encounter in their future careers, and to continue to support student input.

The girl who wore the “boys uniform” to school

Found on Twitter.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

The school dress ‘debate’

Is the school dress ‘debate’ nonsense – just have a range of options, and let students choose? From The Conversation.

January 11, 2017

https://theconversation.com/school-dress-debate-is-a-nonsense-just-have-a-range-of-options-and-let-students-choose-71069

Lauren Rosewarne

For Australians growing up on a diet of American film and TV, seeing their parade of chic and shocking school outfits can only ever bristle. Here, uniform is king; over yonder it’s been a rarity since the 1960s.

In recent days a debate has been reignited about girls being “forced” to wear skirts and dresses to school. A debate that feels less like a gender firestorm and more like a disregard for history and widespread school policy.

2017 marks my 20th year out of high school; I finished with that whole shindig back in 1997. Twenty years ago, while my public school offered a delightfully fetching brown kilt or fawn shirt dress, we ladies could also don the charming green pants.

The idea that girls are being forced into chub-rub garments that they can’t easily run in seems to ignore the developments that have transpired in the great majority of schools over a great number of years. Options exist. Pick the slacks, pick the shorts. Alternate.

In researching this article I’ve spoken to friends who are teachers, school counsellors. Parents. In the private sector, in the public. No dress distress that I could locate. At all. I don’t doubt there are exceptions. To suggest, however, that there’s a widespread catastrophe here is folly.

I’m not, therefore, devoting 800 words to selling a case on why school dresses are or aren’t sexist. We’re in an education system where they aren’t commonly compulsory, so there’d be no point. This doesn’t, however, make them uninteresting. Particularly in our current social climate.

As a high schooler I vacillated between believing that having to wear the itchy green school jumper was malarkey, to actually enjoying not having to think about outfits. Sure, I likely harboured vague notions of wanting to “express” the blackness of my soul through apparel I’d self-selected, but even then I knew that having to do so daily would have soon worn thin.

Schools like uniforms for branding purposes. For social cohesion. For classroom control. In a world of teenagers with beards and boobs, they also likely help distinguish teachers from the underlings.

Parents equally favour the fixed costs, the dodged drama about fitting in, the avoided arguments.

In 2017 the uniform story has become complicated, but not because of the mystical properties of any specific garment in a school’s ensemble. Rather, we’re at the part in our social journey where the individual is king. Where freedom of expression consumes more oxygen than all those economic and social factors that once justified the uniform.

I’m not going to write an identity politics essay. It’s January and I’m saving my energies for the start of the academic year when I’ll have to have the debate weekly with my Gender Studies students. Instead, I’ll focus on policy. On how schools can best handle this issue.

Just as Australians don’t really want to steal any of the prom king/homecoming queen/school shooting hideousness from the US education system, my guess is that there’s little impetus here to abandon uniforms. With the endless parade of stories about leggings bans and spaghetti strap scandals, I dare say most Australian schools aren’t the least bit interested in that whole can o’ worms.

So the question that remains is whether uniforms can continue to serve their purpose(s) in a world in where the concept of a “male uniform” and a “female uniform” is complicated, if not even passé, and in a culture that is – rightly – trying to meet the needs of students who don’t always identify as either.

Students not identifying as male, as female, shouldn’t be forced into apparel based on their name or their genitals or their haircut or any of the other markers we used to control gender. Doing so is not only oppressive but will create the capacity for litigation. Something schools most certainly want to avoid.

So the solution – the path of least change, least legal quagmire – is so simple it seems extraordinary that the conversation is still being had. Just have a range of sanctioned options.

Approve the dresses and the blazers and the jumper and the slacks. List the items that constitute the school’s uniform and allow the students to pick. It needn’t be more complicated than this. Get rid of the “girls” list, abandon the “boys” list, and just have a list of approved apparel.

If the primary mission of schools is education, if the primary function of uniforms is cohesion, schools need to enable students – all students – to feel included so that they can concentrate on the learning. The rest is politics and wasted breath.